Learn why these fancy fonts pose an issue for people with disabilities.

White background with the word “instafonts” repeated in various unicode-based characters that appear like fancy typefaces.
White background with the word “instafonts” repeated in various unicode-based characters that appear like fancy typefaces.
ID: [White background with the word “instafonts” repeated in various Unicode-based characters that appear like fancy typefaces.] Image: instafonts.com

You’ve more than likely seen “fonts” like this on Instagram, but they’re also used on Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, Discord, WhatsApp, Snapchat, Pinterest, and many other places online. For the purposes of this post, I’m referring to them as “Instagram fonts” because that is the platform they are used on most often, and that is the most popular search term used to find them.

Instagram fonts are not accessible to people who use screen readers. …


Let Uncle Sam foot the bill for your accessibility expenses.

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Image for post
Photo by olia danilevich from Pexels. ID: Hands holding hundred dollar bills fanned out.

If you’re a small business, the last thing you need to worry about is a liability. This includes your website, product, and all online services which are required to be accessible to people with disabilities. It’s important to note that accessibility is something that should be included, not just because it’s required, but as a measure to create an equitable experience for all.

The accessibility considerations that you include in your web presence or product reflects directly on your company and positions your brand as one that is truly inclusive…


Mobile phone with the Clubhouse app icon front and center surrounded by other social media icons.
Mobile phone with the Clubhouse app icon front and center surrounded by other social media icons.
ID: Mobile phone with the Clubhouse app icon front and center surrounded by other social media icons. Photo by Adem AY on Unsplash

The audio-based social platform must do more to welcome users with disabilities.

Are you on Clubhouse yet? If you haven’t been invited to this exclusive invite-only club, and feel a bit rejected — you’re not alone. The audio-based social media platform is not accessible to millions of potential users who are disabled as well. In the fallout of a Pandemic that rocked the world, separated us, and has kept us this way — Clubhouse poses a unique solution: a way to connect that mirrors real life by providing the ability to drop into conversations and meet new people with ease…


Red corded telephone on white surface.
Red corded telephone on white surface.
ID: Red corded telephone on white surface. Source: negativespace

Customers with hearing, visual, physical, and cognitive disabilities need more support.

When Katie wanted to handle a package claim with a well known national shipping company, the first thing she did was visit their website on her phone. She tapped around, looking for help, and finally found it — a phone number. For some, this might be a relief, but for Katie this was disheartening. Katie has sensorineural bilateral severe to profound hearing loss, in other words, she is hard of hearing. She wears hearing aids and uses lip-reading to understand what people are saying.

The company did not provide…


Boost your reach to 48 million Americans with this guide.

Screenshot of the youtube website
Screenshot of the youtube website
Photo by Christian Wiediger

Content creators want as many people as possible to enjoy what they spend time putting together, and whether it’s a TikTok video or a tutorial on YouTube — reach matters. The easiest way to make your content available to an additional 48 million Americans is to simply add captions to your videos.

On September 28, 2020, YouTube discontinued community captions across all channels on the platform. This has impacted the Deaf and HoH (hard of hearing) community greatly. Previously, on videos where creators did not add video titles, captions, descriptions, and subtitles people in the community could add them. …


Resources for Disabled job seekers and inclusive employers.

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Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels

It can be a scary thing to admit that you need disability accommodations to a potential employer. In tech — a field that rewards speed and agility, should you disclose something that they might see as a risk? Absolutely! However, make sure you’re opening up to the right people and that you are doing so in a safe space. There is good news — organizations are working to bridge the hiring gap for disabled people who want to work in tech. …


Benefits of inclusive hiring for both your team and business.

Ceramic white unicorn with a gold horn sitting in front of stacks of coins.
Ceramic white unicorn with a gold horn sitting in front of stacks of coins.
Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Imagine for a moment, that you spend your life constantly adapting everything from the way you brush your teeth to the way you socialize, work, and play. It takes a lot of time, energy, and planning to accomplish tasks that other people can do without a second thought. Having a disability makes you approach problems differently. It makes you think more creatively. It amplifies your other senses and skills to compensate for the ones that are not the same as your colleagues. …


Send your message farther with very little additional effort.

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Image for post
Photo by Hello I’m Nik 🎞 on Unsplash

Social media is hitting peak numbers during this pandemic. Marketing departments have a near-captive audience with all of us depending on technology more than ever for school, work, and play. Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter are still the frontrunners when it comes to usage:

Among social media platforms being used during the coronavirus pandemic, Facebook was the most used with 78.1 percent of adults in the United States using the platform as of March 2020. The second-most used platform was Instagram, with 49.5 percent of U.S. adults using the image-sharing social platform…


Common misconceptions, and best practices for accessibility.

Mini figures of Link from Zelda waving their swords or standing ready to battle.
Mini figures of Link from Zelda waving their swords or standing ready to battle.
Photo by Ryan Quintal on Unsplash

There is a lot of debate around the proper use of links versus buttons for CTA’s (call-to-action elements). There are two things we know for sure:

  1. Links take you somewhere. (think of going on an adventure with Link from Zelda)
  2. Buttons let you take action. (think of turning your computer on and off)

So what’s the problem?

We constantly see links styled as buttons. Sometimes this is okay — for example a “submit” button for a form. In other places, this causes an issue for people who use screen readers and cannot see buttons on-screen.


Everyone knows it’s there, but nobody wants to talk about it.

Elephant in the foreground with a man in a wheelchair in the background sitting in shadows.
Elephant in the foreground with a man in a wheelchair in the background sitting in shadows.

It is becoming all too clear to companies that they can no longer afford to be exclusionary in their business practices, and corporate responsibility efforts. Words are not enough, and people are demanding action. This can be a tough pill to swallow for companies that perhaps never considered themselves prejudiced or discriminating towards BIPOC, the LGBTQIA community — and people with disabilities. However, in 2020 it is no longer enough to say “all are welcome here” without action behind those words. …

Christina Lall, CPACC

Working to shift UX design conversations to center people with disabilities. In a state of continuous learning. Sharing what I learn through Access Bridge.

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